Finding your inner hero

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In the introduction to ROKC, Leadership built on the Return On Key Component, I start with a discussion of how “God” – whatever the expression or manifestation – is the ultimate business. No one owns “God” making “God” open source; anyone can appropriate “God” for their own use and many do. “God” is intangible allowing each appropriator to define their own brand, appealing to a different market segment. And like a brand, “God” can be applied to any number of asset classes: education, publishing, real estate, war, and so on.

The above is an allegory of course and not intended to offend anyone. I certainly hope I didn’t and beg your forgiveness if I did.

The point I make with this allegory is “God” truly unknowable. Each “God” has their own messenger and each creation story starts with “God’s” messenger leaves their community for a harsh place of isolation and contemplation before returning with sacred knowledge that enlightens the way of everyone else. This is the archetype we find reflected in the Hero Myth which helps bridge the divide between the spiritual world and the realities of the everyday world.

In Western culture, the Hero Myth is very particularly important. It permeates almost the entire cultural fabric. Not only is this model found in books, movies, music, and such but also in business. Every story told about a business leader includes some unknown quality that is attributable to their success; their inner hero. We mere mortals often aspire to be successful in life and in business this means finding our inner hero. So don’t be too hard on yourself if you fall short, this is a very challenging endeavor. We are trying to fill some big shoes!


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